Unmasking bloggers in India raises some interesting questions

First it was shutting down blog sites after the Mumbai bombings in 2006. This year it was attempting to snoop into communications conducted over BlackBerry's. Now Google has been instructed to reveal the identity of an anonymous blogger in a defamation lawsuit filed by an Indian construction company against them. The story on the Wall … Continue reading Unmasking bloggers in India raises some interesting questions

Addressing hatred on the web

Image courtesy The Economist An article in the Economist explores an issue central to my work - the rise of hate speech on the web and the means through which it's production, dissemination and influence can be constrained. In The brave new world of e-hatred, the Economist notes that, What is much more disturbing is the … Continue reading Addressing hatred on the web

Social and political change in the Arab world through new media

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) has a good write up of an event held recently in London that looked at the impact of new media, the web and Internet on polity and society in the Arab world. It notes that, Keeping up or catching up, respectively, with world standards of communication infrastructure, the Arab and … Continue reading Social and political change in the Arab world through new media

Freedom of Expression in Singapore vs. Sri Lanka

Freedom of Speech, Not Freedom From Consequences, an article about the recent controversy on Singapore's reaction to US Citizen and former Singaporan lawyer Gopolan Nair who was arrested, detained and released on bail for “taunting a Singaporan judge” raises some interesting questions about the freedom of expression. As the article notes, Committee to Protect Journalists … Continue reading Freedom of Expression in Singapore vs. Sri Lanka

Majority favours voluntary code on blogging?

Nearly half of all internet users would support a voluntary code of conduct for bloggers and online commentators, according to research published in The Guardian recently. The paper noted that a survey by legal firm DLA Piper said 46% of web users think bloggers should sign up to a code that reflected the laws on defamation, … Continue reading Majority favours voluntary code on blogging?